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98Z5V

D-Day, June 6th, 1944

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With all the horseshiit going on in this fucked up country right now, it's going to be pretty easy to forget about D-Day, June 6th, 1944. 

Let's not forget that, brothers.

The Normandy Landings changed EVERYTHING about WWII. 

Forget your past, and you will relive your past.

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Thanks for the reminder.  I'll never forget the men who raised me and my friends.  We had a whole crew of neighborhood guys that were WWII vets,  my dad was there also.  As  children we heard many stories about bravery,  fear,  and the impossibility of the deeds done.  I miss that group and the protection they offered.  Mighty big boots to fill.  Are you up to it ? 

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6 hours ago, 98Z5V said:

 

Forget your past, and you will relive your past.

Thanks fore the reminder. I think most in this country have already forgotten.

It’s getting down to the point of none of those guys left. I don’t know a single one personally. All the hero’s of that war that I knew are all gone now. Still a few left from Korea and Vietnam but even they are getting scarce. Guys like me served during the Cold War no one will remember us except fellow veterans. You hero’s are all that remain. I hope our country will appreciate all you have sacrificed for them because it’s not looking good with all the shiit going down.

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3 hours ago, Radioactive said:

Thanks fore the reminder. I think most in this country have already forgotten.

That, unfortunately, is the truth for the most part. I mean, there's still a lot of us that haven't. But our numbers are dwindling as time marches on. I can only think that the men that were there on 6 June 1944, fighting the savagery of fascism and tyranny , would be cringing at what this country has turned in to. But I won't turn this into a political squabble. That's what the political section is for.

A glass held high for each and every one of them!

Especially for the ones that never came back.

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Sad to say nothing up here publically to mark the occasion of Canada's role( Juno Beach and airborne on D-day).

Unfortunately all that history  shows us is that we'll forget history just to repeat it. 

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My dad wasn't in the D-Day landings, but he served in the Pacific Islands. He had the scars from hand-to-hand combat knife wounds (I have his purple heart) but he never said a word about them. My mom told me a couple of stories, but either he was one bad-ass MF'er or she exaggerated a lot. She WAS known to embellish a story now and then, but some uncles and older cousins tell me he was the real deal. He was killed in a railroad accident when I was 7, so I never got the chance to really get to know him. This is just my salute to him.

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9 minutes ago, Sharpshooter said:

My dad wasn't in the D-Day landings, but he served in the Pacific Islands. He had the scars from hand-to-hand combat knife wounds (I have his purple heart) but he never said a word about them. My mom told me a couple of stories, but either he was one bad-ass MF'er or she exaggerated a lot. She WAS known to embellish a story now and then, but some uncles and older cousins tell me he was the real deal. He was killed in a railroad accident when I was 7, so I never got the chance to really get to know him. This is just my salute to him.

Praises for your father.  That's a generation with a mentaility, that we dearly need back in this country. 

Okinawa, perhaps?  That one was bloody, savage battle.  Nothing in the Pacific Islands was an easy fight - we invested heavily to defend and gain that chunk of terrain. 

Edited by 98Z5V

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My dad's oldest brother went on the beach just after D-Day.  I have heard that he was in mine detection but have never talked to him about it myself.  He is a quiet and serious man, even at almost 98 years old now.  He still lives in his own home with his son.

He is sharp as hell and was one of the key people that found and excavated this:

https://texasbeyondhistory.net/horn/

That generation has a different mindset that is rare these days.  It was born of hard work, sacrifice and dealing with adversity and coming out on top.  Just like losing WWI heroes, losing these men and women will make the world a worse place.

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That horn deal is pretty cool Doc. 
 

losing these folks WILL make the world a lesser place for sure, but never having them would have made it even worse. 

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8 hours ago, Armed Eye Doc said:

My dad's oldest brother went on the beach just after D-Day.  I have heard that he was in mine detection but have never talked to him about it myself.  He is a quiet and serious man, even at almost 98 years old now.  He still lives in his own home with his son.

He is sharp as hell and was one of the key people that found and excavated this:

https://texasbeyondhistory.net/horn/

That generation has a different mindset that is rare these days.  It was born of hard work, sacrifice and dealing with adversity and coming out on top.  Just like losing WWI heroes, losing these men and women will make the world a worse place.

Thanks for the link Doc, another part of Texas History not taught in our public schools, but should be taught. I understand the importance of preserving these sites, some bunch of snowflakes probably would like to see much of our history eliminated.

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9 hours ago, Armed Eye Doc said:

My dad's oldest brother went on the beach just after D-Day.  I have heard that he was in mine detection but have never talked to him about it myself.  He is a quiet and serious man, even at almost 98 years old now.  He still lives in his own home with his son.

He is sharp as hell and was one of the key people that found and excavated this:

https://texasbeyondhistory.net/horn/

Very Cool :thumbup: Been giving a lot of thought on the elderly lately........

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